Author Topic: Microsoft reflects on a 64-bit version of Visual Studio  (Read 431 times)

jj2007

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Microsoft reflects on a 64-bit version of Visual Studio
« on: November 21, 2017, 10:29:19 PM »
https://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio-2015/suggestions/2255687-make-vs-scalable-by-switching-to-64-bit?page=1&per_page=20
Quote
Visual Studio Team (Product Team, Microsoft Visual Studio) responded  ·  June 02, 2016
...
Firstly, we recognize the spirit that is largely driving the request to move the Visual Studio IDE to be a 64-bit application
...
While we’ve seriously considered this porting effort, at this time we don’t believe the returns merit the investment ... moving to 64-bit isn’t a panacea – as others have noted (https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ricom/2016/01/11/a-little-64-bit-follow-up/), unless the work doesn’t fit into a 32-bit address space, moving to 64-bit can actually degrade performance.
...
we are not moving the IDE to 64-bit

The linked MSDN blog is worth reading ("the price of cache misses should not be underestimated").

Jokaste

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Re: Microsoft reflects on a 64-bit version of Visual Studio
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2017, 06:59:29 AM »
They say YES and
They say NO
Kenavo
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hutch--

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Re: Microsoft reflects on a 64-bit version of Visual Studio
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 11:59:19 AM »
Good article, the data size difference makes 64 bit bigger and on any given hardware, bigger data equals slower operation. Your gains in 64 bit is memory and if you are working with big data, it is the way to go as > 2 gig in 32 bit is a pain to deal with. Another factor is that with twice as many registers you save stack entry and exit overhead in many instances, particularly with an argument list of 4 or less where you use registers to pass the data.

Writing in 64 bit is a different brain that 32 bit and the quicker the assumptions of 32 are dropped, the better the 64 bit code will be. As it was with MS-DOS going into Win3.?, in many instances well written 16 bit DOS kicked its arse so for exactly the same reason, well written 32 bit code will often beat normal 64 bit code but over time the gap will narrow as compilers and programmers get better at 64 bit code but 32 bit code can never close the gap at what 64 bit can routinely do with big memory and more registers.
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