Author Topic: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars  (Read 4469 times)


K_F

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2012, 09:00:50 AM »
If I remember correctly Hutch has a fetish for FORDs  :icon_mrgreen:
'Sire, Sire!... the peasants are Revolting !!!'
'Yes, they are.. aren't they....'

dedndave

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2012, 09:28:19 PM »
Willa Ford, Faith Ford.....

npnw

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2012, 04:11:23 AM »
K_F,

Quote
If I remember correctly Hutch has a fetish for FORDs 

That is why I posted it.  It also reads good.


hutch--

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2012, 10:33:27 AM »
True confessions, my first car when i was a kid was an FJ Holden, looks like the first picture but with a different grille. Graduated to a Ford V8 engined Studibaker (1954 model) then only Ford V8s. Last car was the old coupe that died last year, body clapped out and I am not in a position to fix car bodies any longer.

My next car if there ever is one will be a $1000 to $2000 sh*tbox with different coloured panels and a few dents that is not worth stealing and no-one will be game to run into it.  :P
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mywan

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2012, 02:16:40 PM »
No matter how nice a car I own I still need a rat trap around for recreation. One that I can take into the mountains and try out those trails without worrying whether it can actually make it or not. Ford trucks have traditionally done better and held up longer on farm terrain. The opposite has traditionally been true of Chevy trucks, which performs better and last longer on highway conditions. That's been my general historical observations anyway, with exceptions. Certain cheap rat traps have done much better than Fords is rough terrain. Among them was a beat up Subaru, Suzuki Samurai, etc. Recently I decided I'm going to get a moped also, for slow paced photography/sightseeing trips.

dedndave

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2012, 11:09:24 AM »
ya know, i often think they do not give Henry Ford enough credit
the concept of an assembly line is well known - and one of my favorites
while it's nice to have light, i think it's far better than anything Edison ever did - lol

but - a small detail of that concept is the idea that parts can be made that are imperfect,
and still fit together when assembled, provided the manufacturing tolerences are accounted for

it was one of the things that kept the US on the leading edge throughout much of the 20th century

npnw

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2012, 02:25:50 PM »
DednDave, 

Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AK-47 .

The design principles on how they made the tolerences looser, not tighter made for a weapon that can withstand a lot. Yet you give that up in accuracy.  Just one example I can think of where the opposite was true.

Ford didn't designed the moving assembly line.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_line

Hutch, might have to set you up with a mopar.  Have to figure cost to Australia, although the new Dart might be available. Have to wait till prices drop on a used one, but would be a fun car for you to drive.

hutch--

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2012, 02:51:16 PM »
I have just recently knocked back my mum's old Hyundai, nothing wrong with it, my brother's girlfriend has been driving it for years but she has just inherited a much later car from her father passing away. The problem was it was in Queensland and I would have had to fly up then drive it back to Sydney, get it re-registered in NSW and go through all of the hassle of parking in my local area.
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MichaelW

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2012, 03:18:51 PM »
I take it adding a garage to your house is not an option?
Well Microsoft, here’s another nice mess you’ve gotten us into.

hutch--

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2012, 03:56:56 PM »
No, if it was i would still own the old Ford. I live in an inner city terrace house where you have to fight for street parking AND this stupid PHUKING local council.
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dedndave

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2012, 12:33:56 AM »
Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AK-47 .

The design principles on how they made the tolerences looser, not tighter made for a weapon that can withstand a lot. Yet you give that up in accuracy.  Just one example I can think of where the opposite was true.
i thought that's what i said   :biggrin:

Ford didn't designed the moving assembly line.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assembly_line
he may not have invented the idea but, from the article you cited...
Quote
Henry Ford was the first to master the moving assembly line and was able to improve other aspects of industry by doing so (such as reducing labor hours required to produce a single vehicle, and increased production numbers and parts). .... Ford was the first company to build large factories around the assembly line concept.

npnw

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Re: A salute to Australia's 10 most important cars
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2012, 03:12:01 AM »
DednDave,

Quote
i thought that's what i said   

It was exactly what you said :) I was just repeating what you said with an example I could think of :) to validate your point.

The idea to think out of the box is a good one. Also there is a quote that he knew all about everyone else's design.  He was then able to make something unique.

Quote
he may not have invented the idea but, from the article you cited...

Again the point I was making was that he improved on it. 

Applying this to software, I guess my point is that people should  learn as much as you can about software.

How it is works.

Then finding ways to improve it.

People are always saying don't reinvent the wheel.

Yes, don't reinvent the same wheel, that isn't the idea.

However, improving on it is not the same.

Hutch and Masm are important tools in understanding software and how it works.

I guess I'm always thinking about software design in one way or another.... even if it requires Ford, Australia, and Guns!