Author Topic: Windows 10 Anniversary Update  (Read 11448 times)

GuruSR

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2016, 02:19:12 PM »
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==WHAT BLACKBIRD DOES==

> 1. Removes Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA)
> 2. Removes Windows 10 Upgrade setup files on Vista, 7, 8, 8.1
> 3. Removes a bunch of Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 telemetry updates

1.  Bad, promotes piracy, never a good thing, ever...  WGA validates your license key for Windows, without it, you can use any illegal key and although you'll never receive updates, you can still use Windows illegally...
2.  Err, Vista?!  Why?!  It's not capable of Windows 10 for any update/upgrade, Vista is DEAD (as of April next year, totally), someone went crazy there, I think he just wrote Vista as a spite. or copied and pasted it from 3.
3.  Not sure what telemetry updates are in Vista, since Vista doesn't even support Location awareness.  Mind you, after I got to the system, and nuked 90% of what wasn't necessary, it out ran XP.

<RANT>I almost feel like Rick Mercer...

I'm an I.T., been so for 20 years, own and operate my own company, update, support and build new PCs, networks, and integration of that and other devices.  Back in the XP volume licensing fiasco, small minded people who bought into PC retail company franchises were selling volume licenses to customers, which Microsoft found out and terminated all volume licensing (permanently), while those people pocketed the money for the full license of Windows for each computer they sold that way, leaving the owners in the dark about their licenses being invalid and no longer entitled for updates and that they technically were illegally using Windows.  It meant they had to buy a new license and I wound up with a few calls dealing with people who had those keys and I found out the companies involved so, I passed the info onto Microsoft, but sadly, those people were stuck having to spend $100+ on a legal copy of Windows AGAIN.  So when some one/site tells me to disable GWA, I immediately know it's going to be abused for piracy.</RANT>

GuruSR.
Learned 68k Motorola Asm instruction set in 30 minutes on the way to an Amiga Developer's Forum meeting.
Following week wrote a kernel level memory pool manager in 68k assembler for fun.

rrr314159

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2016, 11:13:01 AM »
I can't agree. Haven't used Blackbird but other programs like it. They can be useful for overcoming many problems with Windows. No doubt criminals might abuse these good products. But criminals can abuse guns, trucks, knives, rat poison, cell phones, water and air. Doesn't mean those should be banned.

Windows cost maybe 10 dollars per copy, even less, to produce but they charged 100. They have as many lawyers as programmers, to enforce their monopoly. Their profits are abusive. Who cares if Bill Gates loses a few dollars to Windows copiers? He deserves 81.8000001 billion instead of just a lousy 81.8?

Products like Blackbird are necessary because Windows has become a mess. Look at the registry. I could mention dozens more examples of terrible design, but this one should be enough.

Sorry, products like Blackbird fill a legitimate need and it's not reasonable to castigate legal users for the crimes of a minority. Particularly when the "victim" is the richest man on the planet via illegal and unethical monopolistic practices.
I am NaN ;)

anunitu

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2016, 02:04:32 PM »
Do I detect just a tiny bit of negative thought concerning MS. Might also detect a tiny bit of paranoia on the part of MS.
It is a very sad case that the users and the makers seem at odds,but remember the long running dispute between Mac and PC users.

Everyone seems to want an OS to come running in on a white horse it seems. Been a long time people have been waiting for Jesus,so it might be a long time for that OS,2 or 3 thousand years perhaps. But I suppose Miracles do happen,BUT don't hold your breath waiting.

rrr314159

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2016, 02:51:47 PM »
Windows isn't all that bad. I'm mainly complaining about the money.
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GuruSR

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2016, 02:52:55 PM »
I can't agree. Haven't used Blackbird but other programs like it. They can be useful for overcoming many problems with Windows. No doubt criminals might abuse these good products. But criminals can abuse guns, trucks, knives, rat poison, cell phones, water and air. Doesn't mean those should be banned.

Not banning, I just felt sorry for people who got taken by fly-by-night computer stores that charged people for the operating system (XP) using a volume license that later MS nuked.  Like all those people got taken by those fly-by-night stores, that had nothing to do with MS getting the money, as volume licenses were dirt cheap (and not in MS's best interests to sell).

Products like Blackbird are necessary because Windows has become a mess. Look at the registry. I could mention dozens more examples of terrible design, but this one should be enough.

Wait, we *are* talking about Windows right?  3.1 was the only OS that wasn't a mess, everything else since has been an utter disaster.  Each version is like adding 10 pancakes on top of the last one, eventually the stack crashes to the ground and the original buried under a pile of laggy code. Windows 95 ran two ways, "looks good and runs crappy" or "looks crappy and runs good", the same goes for all versions of Windows since, including 10, 7 being the worst.  Miss the days when an OS sat on a chip that nobody could screw with, shame Microsoft didn't stay in that era, we'd all be better for it.

Sorry, products like Blackbird fill a legitimate need and it's not reasonable to castigate legal users for the crimes of a minority. Particularly when the "victim" is the richest man on the planet via illegal and unethical monopolistic practices.

Oh, don't get me wrong, the Blackbird stuff isn't what I was upset about, was the abuse it's going to invoke.  Much like the telephone scammers using Teamviewer to scam people out of money because "their computer is sending viruses/errors/hackers to hell".  Not Teamviewer's fault (well, in some part it is, because there's no way to track the usage), as is the same with Blackbird.  Those telescammers, make billions a year in scam income, really don't think that'll ever get stopped, even though a recent arrest of some 250+ scammers in India recently would even put a dent in it.

GuruSR.
Learned 68k Motorola Asm instruction set in 30 minutes on the way to an Amiga Developer's Forum meeting.
Following week wrote a kernel level memory pool manager in 68k assembler for fun.

rrr314159

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #20 on: October 07, 2016, 11:10:54 PM »
I just felt sorry for people who got taken by fly-by-night computer stores that charged people for the operating system (XP) using a volume license that later MS nuked.

Sure, so do I

Quote from: GuruSR
Each version is like adding 10 pancakes on top of the last one, eventually the stack crashes to the ground and the original buried under a pile of laggy code.

The good part of Windows got buried under a pile of ... well, let's call it "pancakes" :biggrin:
I am NaN ;)

jj2007

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2016, 11:19:20 PM »
The good part of Windows got buried under a pile of ... well, let's call it "pancakes" :biggrin:

Re: The future of windows assembly programming
« Reply #34 on: December 21, 2011, 03:32:16 AM »
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I have a slightly more pessimistic version: Windows 7 needs 16GB of disk space, that is 2700 times the amount of Win 3.1. There are only marginal improvements since then, so it means that they accumulated an immense pile of C crap (remember our comparative advantage is that we can read and judge the disassembled assembly code of, say, WinWord.exe  :greensml:). But deep deep under the surface of that dumping ground, a little engine called DOS is still running the whole thing, and only a handful of people know its secrets

TWell

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2016, 12:25:35 AM »
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I have a slightly more pessimistic version: Windows 7 needs 16GB of disk space, that is 2700 times the amount of Win 3.1. There are only marginal improvements since then, so it means that they accumulated an immense pile of C crap (remember our comparative advantage is that we can read and judge the disassembled assembly code of, say, WinWord.exe  :greensml:).
C isn't reason for that? Most of that "pancakes" are written with C++ and c#.
WinSxS directory is quite big too, like 5 Gb ?

Nice disk usage program: https://sourceforge.net/projects/windirstat/
« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 03:08:04 AM by TWell »

jj2007

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #23 on: October 08, 2016, 12:30:48 AM »
C isn't reason for that? Most of that "pancakes" are written with C++ and c#.

Hey, I wrote that 5 years ago, didn't know the difference then :P

GuruSR

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #24 on: October 08, 2016, 06:15:22 AM »
Quote
I have a slightly more pessimistic version: Windows 7 needs 16GB of disk space, that is 2700 times the amount of Win 3.1. There are only marginal improvements since then, so it means that they accumulated an immense pile of C crap (remember our comparative advantage is that we can read and judge the disassembled assembly code of, say, WinWord.exe  :greensml:). But deep deep under the surface of that dumping ground, a little engine called DOS is still running the whole thing, and only a handful of people know its secrets

Actually, I was glad Microsoft jumped into the tablet market (phone, well, meh, Windows 7 phone was sad, 8 was sadder, 10 wasn't bad but by that time, nobody wanted it, poor Nokia).  Entering into the tablet market with 1 foot (2 would have been better) and designing that flop of a kickstand design (which break more than any other tablet on the market), would have been better if they'd "followed the flow" and ripped Windows 8 a new one, like, fully.  But, old habits die hard and the pancake pile of C bloatware was reloaded into the tablet, only to show just how under-impressive Windows really is.  Imagine having Windows 7 Premium on the first Surface, hit the start menu with your finger and wait 10 to 30 seconds for the list to show up.  Anyone ever wants to see just how bad Windows does anything GUI related, put it into an emulator and crank the CPU down to 500Mhz.  Oh the joy of watching it redraw the entire window, pixel by pixel, line by line (you can tell I've done this, really should have Youtubed it, though maybe someone will).

Now, with Windows 8 (and later on 10) being in a tablet, Microsoft knew their heavy code was going to be a battery killer and a performance hit, so they disabled a good chunk of the flashy flair that had been growing since 95 and opted for flat and blandness (because DirectDraw and DirectX are not object orientated enough to utilize the hardware for surface layering like OpenGL is).  Sadly, the stuff that made 7 look "Oh so pretty!", is still in 8 and 10 just waiting to ruin your day.  I'm hoping Microsoft starts to strip out all the worthless C code and do full rewrites (like IE got a few years back with 9), it'll reduce performance issues and reduce space constraints (both memory and storage).  But... I know them enough to know, "It ain't gonna happen!"  "Oh look, a DOS box running Linux!  Wow, faster than fast and at a quarter of the speed of the new machine running Windows 10 Pro!  Cooool!"  <LOL>And for those people who don't know DOS stands for "Denial Of Service", which is why they took it out of 2000 and beyond.</LOL>   :greensml:

GuruSR.
Learned 68k Motorola Asm instruction set in 30 minutes on the way to an Amiga Developer's Forum meeting.
Following week wrote a kernel level memory pool manager in 68k assembler for fun.

hutch--

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2016, 07:57:21 AM »
Its a sign of age when you remember how fast CGA text mode was in DOS (The MS_DOS version) and if at the time you ran graphics mode in VGA it always felt terribly slow in comparison. Over the last 30 years this progression has remained much the same, each new Windows version had much higher video demands than the last one. The current best test I have is using VNC. If you open a VNC window to an XP machine it looks reasonably good and fast but try and load a recent 64 bit Windows version from XP and you will see just how demanding Win7 and Win10 64 are.

I run 1920 x 1080 on all 4 machines I have running so the comparison is reasonably good. On my last XP box, 2 boxes earlier than the Win10 box I am working on now, I pinched the video card from the Win7 machine and put it into the XP box and the video while using it is genuinely fast, almost feels as fast as CGA mode on the ancient stuff. The Win7 box got a 2 gig replacement that was very ordinary but worked OK.

When an update comes for the Win10 box video, its another 350 meg and after installing it, nothing looks any better or runs faster so I don't go out of my way to install it in a hurry. Apart from development, the main thing I am interested in is good quality video and my last 3 machines all did high res video OK.
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GuruSR

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2016, 03:08:11 PM »
Its a sign of age when you remember how fast CGA text mode was in DOS (The MS_DOS version) and if at the time you ran graphics mode in VGA it always felt terribly slow in comparison. Over the last 30 years this progression has remained much the same, each new Windows version had much higher video demands than the last one. The current best test I have is using VNC. If you open a VNC window to an XP machine it looks reasonably good and fast but try and load a recent 64 bit Windows version from XP and you will see just how demanding Win7 and Win10 64 are.

Naaaah, CGA mode was faster than the punch card machine punching the *hell* out of a jammed card, shook the whole floor until the instructor came flying in and switched the big power box off on the wall.  Asked me if it was mine, I said "Not mine, I'm still punching mine out, no clue who put that stuff in there" (shortly after a sign went up, "You must STAY with this machine while it runs or you lose access to it!"), never did find out who it was, but they did.

I run 1920 x 1080 on all 4 machines I have running so the comparison is reasonably good. On my last XP box, 2 boxes earlier than the Win10 box I am working on now, I pinched the video card from the Win7 machine and put it into the XP box and the video while using it is genuinely fast, almost feels as fast as CGA mode on the ancient stuff. The Win7 box got a 2 gig replacement that was very ordinary but worked OK.

When an update comes for the Win10 box video, its another 350 meg and after installing it, nothing looks any better or runs faster so I don't go out of my way to install it in a hurry. Apart from development, the main thing I am interested in is good quality video and my last 3 machines all did high res video OK.

<GOATING>What, you're not running 4k?</GOATING>  As for updates to any version of Windows, expect them to be merely builds (when they're that large) and security tweaks, like the most recent one that broke %systemroot% file sharing outside of Homegroups, unless it was Norton 360 being a complete 0 degree of help (that wasn't a joke, even though I just made notion that 360 winds up being back at 0).  Ah well, another company that will do my best to keep happy and hey, kick Norton to the bit curb.  Ooo, there's a good name for a cloud service "BitCurb.com, where all your crap goes and we can't find it"...  Buy now!  (Scary, there *was* a bitcurb.com, now it's up for sale...  It is the internet, nobody should be suprised, there is a farts.com after all...)

GuruSR.
Learned 68k Motorola Asm instruction set in 30 minutes on the way to an Amiga Developer's Forum meeting.
Following week wrote a kernel level memory pool manager in 68k assembler for fun.

jj2007

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2016, 12:25:07 PM »
Enough ranting on Windows 10, folks! On the positive side, I just found a new feature: I suspended the notebook, it went silent, but after a while, it came alive again, with the lid closed :t

Isn't that a bright new feature? Apparently, it has switched itself on to download a new fat update. This is progress :t :t

hutch--

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2016, 02:58:21 PM »
 :biggrin:
Quote
Asked me if it was mine, I said "Not mine, I'm still punching mine out, no clue who put that stuff in there" (shortly after a sign went up, "You must STAY with this machine while it runs or you lose access to it!"), never did find out who it was, but they did.
To be honest I was much more interested in punch card operators than punch cards.  :P
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GuruSR

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Re: Windows 10 Anniversary Update
« Reply #29 on: October 31, 2016, 06:54:18 AM »
To be honest I was much more interested in punch card operators than punch cards.  :P

Well, the process I remember was:

1.)  Write your program out by hand (on paper,  :shock: )
2.)  Attempt to read what you wrote with that "impressively neat" hand writing.
3.)  Find no errors in your code (because repunching all those cards is a "joy").
4.)  Number each card based on the "line" of code you're punching and punch the instruction and the value / register boxes out.
5.)  Place them in a pile, so 1 is on the bottom.
6.)  Load the machine, make sure that the cards are all aligned in the input tray.
7.)  Check the output tray for clear usage (I took the stupid thing off and put a box under the area instead).
8.)  Push the go button and pray it didn't jam.  Because that makes one HELL of a noise and freaks the instructors out.
9.)  Pick up the result card (the last one with just a number on it and no punches) to receive the value.
10.)  Hand the result card in at next class.

First time I took the output tray off, you could see my cards floating down to the box, and a few didn't make it and wound up out in the hallway, someone started laughing and the instructor came in to see what was going on.  I basically said, "It won't jam on the output tray if it's not there and I don't have to see you freak out over it happening."  We both laughed, except I had 100+ cards to pick up and re-sort afterwards, wasn't too funny.  Well, neither was someone dumping theirs all over the room, that was painful, didn't laugh at that, helped them pick it up.

So glad we got computers the next year, with green text on a tube screen so small, today's 7" iPads almost dwarf them.  The funny part was watching the instructor type on it, like the Incredible Hulk typing on a 5 inch Cell Phone's touch screen keyboard (vertically), he just looked so out of sorts.

GuruSR.
Learned 68k Motorola Asm instruction set in 30 minutes on the way to an Amiga Developer's Forum meeting.
Following week wrote a kernel level memory pool manager in 68k assembler for fun.