Author Topic: Working on a damaged laptop.  (Read 1815 times)

TWell

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Re: Working on a damaged laptop.
« Reply #30 on: January 21, 2017, 10:17:01 AM »
wusa.exe
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/934307/description-of-the-windows-update-standalone-installer-in-windows

I also download one msu installed it with wusa.exe after i disconnect PC from LAN.
After reboot that PC downloads 64 updates and install those in normal way.
Now i wait when it broke again.

Now it installed
January, 2017 Security Montly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64...

FORTRANS

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Re: Working on a damaged laptop.
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2017, 04:31:55 AM »
Hi,

   An update of sorts.  I had a friend get a new keyboard.  It turns
out that the motherboard connecter was bad, not the keyboard.
I had wanted to get into the BIOS to change the boot order, and
a USB keyboard does not seem to allow that.

   As we were commiserating about the keyboard, and drinking
beer, I handed off the laptop and the keyboard to a friend.  I told
him how to start up a command prompt and had him look about.
Some comments about malware ensued.  General complaints,
wondering about what happened, and noticing that in its current
state it was worthless.  I mentioned the Acer recovery directory
and asked for opinions.  That led to running said recovery software
(the beer was partly responsible, I think) and restoring it to "like
new" or whatever.  The other option was trying to save the existing
data, and that sounded less than useful at the time (beer again?).

   Amazing what is bundled with an Acer computer.  The setup ran
through 29 steps after the OS 7 was restored.  McAfee antivirus
was one, just like my Windows 8.1 system (yuck).

   Anyway, not entirely sure what to do now.  Windows Update I
suppose.  Suggestions welcome (probably).  Looks like it is working
and the malware seems to be gone.  The mousepad is rather ghastly,
and I am going to get an external mouse.  A nice screen apparently.

   Not that anyone is/was curious, just thought it would be polite
to finish this off.

Regards,

Steve N.

hutch--

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Re: Working on a damaged laptop.
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2017, 06:07:21 AM »
To save my Win7 64 box, I found a trick app that stopped the auto-win10 upgrade then once the attempted forced upgrades were finished I hunted up the most recent collection of updates and installed them and nothing appeared to break but I keep auto-update turned off so Microsoft cannot make a mess of it. As always, make sure you have a full disk image available for the boot drive and a boot CD to run it if you have to.

I confess to being really annoyed at Microsoft for the attempted forced upgrade to Win10 as my Win7 64 bit is the black box Ultimate retail version that cost me some rediculous price and the last thing I wanted was a broken version of Win10 that wrecked the capacity of Win7.
hutch at movsd dot com
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Blackmasm

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Re: Working on a damaged laptop.
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2017, 01:16:00 AM »
Hi

Just for future reference, the system restore will put so much preloaded crap on the system that it's just as well, if you have the license key, which should be on the bottom, sometimes under the battery, to just reinstall from a copy of someone's Windows installation CD/DVD - by default BIO's usually boot from CD-DVD first, so there's no need to access the BIOS to change the boot order.
Then download any additional drivers needed from the manufacturer's website. - annoyingly this sometimes requires the network driver to be downloaded on another machine first and transferred via USB, but the clean install of windows 7 will include USB drivers so that should work ok.
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