Author Topic: What happened this weekend  (Read 1016 times)

LordAdef

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What happened this weekend
« on: December 12, 2017, 05:57:23 AM »
Hi!

So I was in this Beach Resort with the family. As soon as we arrived I noticed a group of about 60 people wearing a t-shirt saying "Make Game, not war" or something similar.

Well, soon I approached one of the guys who turned out to be a game designer. They all work in a game company here in Rio de Janeiro.

So, We introduced ourselves and soon I told him I program in Assembly, and am doing a game in Masm.

You guys should see his face when I said the word "Assembly"!!!! He bent and started doing body reverences  as if I was a god hahahahahahaha

The point is, all those guys are working with Unity (a game development platform, full of ready made stuff), so from their perspective we are indeed gods....

I thought I should share it with you,

Alex


jj2007

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 06:57:01 AM »
Nice story ;-)

I am always deeply impressed when I see recent CGI movies, and wonder how much SIMD, AVX etc there is under the hood. What we are doing here is certainly old-fashioned, but when it comes to pure speed, it's difficult to beat assembler...

FORTRANS

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 09:29:53 AM »
Hi Alex,

   Thank you for sharing the story.  I put on a smile for that one.

Cheers

Steve N.

Siekmanski

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2017, 05:54:53 PM »
All those impressive effects are mostly done with pixel and vertex shader programming.
This can also be done in assembly. ( it has his own mnemonics set )

Are there any members on the forum who have touched this topic?
I would like to explore and try this out one day....

A lot of pixel shader examples can be found here,
https://www.shadertoy.com/
Creative coders use backward thinking techniques as a strategy.

GoneFishing

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 01:06:21 AM »
I am always deeply impressed when I see recent CGI movies, and wonder how much SIMD, AVX etc there is under the hood. What we are doing here is certainly old-fashioned, but when it comes to pure speed, it's difficult to beat assembler...

It's mostly C++ Land where they use compiler switches for different SSE levels. You would be even more deeply impressed when  you saw  25+Mb EXEs or 50++Mb  DLLs with graphics stuff.

@Siekmanski:
One time I was getting close to playing with shaders programmatically. I wanted to start from viewing disassembled shaders ( feature available since DX 10 ). FXC (Effects Compiler) utility also can produce assembly listings: 
Compiling a Shader for Specific Hardware

Read this starter tutorial (  it's OLD !). It describes different shader assemblers : 
Shader Programming Part I: Fundamentals of Vertex Shaders

It's very interesting field. The trick is that modern graphics develops so fast that it's difficult to simply stay in tune with current trends

P.S.:  Modern  CGI movies  are often rendered by different raytracing engines ( renderes)

Siekmanski

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2017, 07:01:19 AM »
@Siekmanski:
One time I was getting close to playing with shaders programmatically.

What made you stop at this close point?

Thanks for the links.

Had a look at the shaders part of the directx sdk. No examples without the bulky directx wrapper lib.
Maybe I can use the offline compiler FXC.exe to compile the shaders and include them as binary files.

I have the whole evening for myself and decided to explore the possibilities to use shaders without those bulky dll's
Of course it must be able to run in my d3d9 framework without the d3dx9 wrapper library, or else I quit...

There's a lot of mathematics involved in writing pixel shaders, or should I say it's only mathematics.
Creative coders use backward thinking techniques as a strategy.

GoneFishing

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2017, 07:29:36 AM »
You're welcome!

HD with Windows 8.1 has died and I migrated to Linux  :biggrin:

In those times I played a lot with graphics. If you wish I can advice a lot of interesting ( and outdated stuff ) :
NVIDIA OpenGl and DirectX  SDKs: 9,10,11.
NVIDIA CgFx Viewer: http://www.nvidia.ru/object/IO_CgFXViewer.html
Cg, CgFx are also discontinued long ago projects
FxComposer + effects library 
MentalMill - visual environment for building shaders and export to various formats ( legacy tool )
AMD RenderMonkey

and lot more


K_F

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2017, 08:48:49 AM »
Not specifically shaders, but I was looking at using the GPU for number crunching.
I found an attempt at assembler programming of GPU's but it was actively discouraged by Nvidia and AMD, and they gave no support to it what-so-ever.
Preferring everyone to follow their C route... so the GPU assembler thing died.

A pity, and fark them, as I dumped their stuff (Nvidia/AMD/Xmos/..) and moved onto Intel FPGAs (stratix10)... toys that are so much better  :biggrin:
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'Yes, they are.. aren't they....'

hutch--

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Re: What happened this weekend
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2017, 11:14:23 AM »
Van,

If you are seriously into number crunching, a late model x64 box is no slouch in terms of this type of work, especially if you can multi-thread it. I am a bit rusty in this area as I don't use it much but with the FP primitives for fancy stuff and a couple of generation of SSE/AVX for simpler sequential stuff, you should not have any problems speed wise. A normal i7 quad has 8 threads, this Haswell E/EP I am using has 12 threads and some of the later 10 core versions have 20 so you should be able to get enough hoot out of it if you need it.
hutch at movsd dot com
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