Author Topic: How programming works.....  (Read 2462 times)

Siekmanski

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #90 on: August 20, 2018, 08:44:26 AM »
 :t

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Well, about proving whether God exists is another story. I can FEEL, and how could I prove omnipresence? The all in all.

Well, my brain tells me feelings can hurt when not understood.

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Hutch, Nidud, Siekmanski, something tells me that you believe in God. You can talk, do not be ashamed :). Open your hearts, have faith and hope.

Luckily for me I'm not indoctrinated as a child ( only 17% in my country are theists ) with horror fairytales and ignorance.
Thanks to my parents and my education, I am free to think what I want and don't need to listen or to obey to an evil spokesman of an undefined entity.
My heart is open for reality and my faith and hope is in science.

My hope was to explore the universe in a spaceship.  :biggrin: ( has been taken away from me by religion )
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hutch--

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #91 on: August 20, 2018, 08:07:25 PM »
Antiquity had the correct distinction via one of the ancient "schoolmen" William of Occam. He simple drew the distinction between science and religion, the former being the empirical sciences, the latter being the mediaevil church. Now if you were a member of Dun's school (Duns Scotis), you were politically incorrect and always wrong and thus a "dunce" in modern English.

Now mineiro has an interesting point here, "science" has a near parallel history to religion and it has developed over time, only a hundred years ago, you had to postulate "ether" to fill the spaces between objects in space, these days we call it a vacuum, go back a bit further, another 400 years or so and the world was flat and if you sailed too far west in the Atlantic, you would fall off the edges. In modern times you would have to fall off the Empire State Building.

Going back further, you have the ancient Greek concept of the 4 elements yet today we have many more. This concept came back into Europe in the 11th/12th century via the Moors who had preserved the Greek and Roman sciences. It was the church in Spain that translated the arabic versions of the sciences into latin and spread it around Europe.

My point for mentioning this information is the near parallel development of religion and science, both having developed over time and neither being in a position to seriously criticise the other, even though both have made their criticisms over time. It was religion through the Muslim Moors and Catholic Spanish that preserved the old knowledge which in part led to the modern forms of science that we now know.
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hutch--

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #92 on: August 21, 2018, 01:15:46 AM »
> Luckily for me I'm not indoctrinated as a child ( only 17% in my country are theists ) with horror fairytales and ignorance.

Its not my area but I know that the Spanish occupation of the Netherlands was a nasty brutal affair and it had much to do with why the Netherlands developed a very high level of tolerance to different religious views as a consequence.
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Siekmanski

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #93 on: August 21, 2018, 04:58:42 AM »
In my lifetime I never experienced any serious friction between different religions.
Think we are a tolerant country compared to other countries.
Although there is one migrant group that's not willing to integrate and participate in Dutch society.
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caballero

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #94 on: August 21, 2018, 05:29:50 AM »
In reality Spain did not occupy The Netherlands. Due to the marriage policy of Spain with other European royal houses, Carlos I was born, the heir to the throne of Spain, in Ghent (Belgium). Subsequently, due to the lack of offspring in this house, he was also the heir to the throne of several European territories, to which belonged what we now know as the Netherlands.

Here are the European territories of Charles I due exclusively to dynastic rights:


When Carlos I died or V of Germany and happened to him in the throne Felipe II, this one not even knew to be expressed in the language of this territory (and it does not surprise to me), reason why was considered a stranger. For this and other reasons, the Flanders war happened.

There is a beautiful painting about it drawn by one of the greatest painters of all history, Velázquez. It's in the Prado Museum, in Madrid. The painting is called The Surrender of Breda.


In it one sees in the foreground General Espinola in the service of Spain accepting with courtesy the surrender of Justin Nassau, of the Orange house, delivering the keys of the city.

Interestingly, San Nicolás or Sinterklaas in Dutch is the Santa Claus in Holland. He seems to be a saint who lives in Madrid, Spain, and is loaded with sweets for Dutch children.

A couple of years ago I saw a horror movie about San Nicolás. Curious.
https://youtu.be/lYCBKgzuNak
https://youtu.be/2z8XAo4Lpuw

I imagine that all the zombies were evil Spaniards.

xx
En un lugar de la Mancha de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme

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Siekmanski

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #95 on: August 21, 2018, 07:52:26 AM »
yeah Alfonso, our ancestors had a little bit of a fight.

The Eighty Years' War (Dutch: Tachtigjarige Oorlog; Spanish: Guerra de los Ochenta Años) or Dutch War of Independence (1568–1648)was a revolt of the Seventeen Provinces of what are today the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg against the political and religious hegemony of Philip II of Spain, the sovereign of the Habsburg Netherlands. After the initial stages, Philip II deployed his armies and regained control over most of the rebelling provinces. Under the leadership of the exiled William the Silent, the northern provinces continued their resistance. They eventually were able to oust the Habsburg armies, and in 1581 they established the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. The war continued in other areas, although the heartland of the republic was no longer threatened; this included the beginnings of the Dutch Colonial Empire, which at the time were conceived as carrying overseas the war with Spain. After a 12-year truce in which the Dutch Republic achieved de facto recognition, hostilities broke out again around 1619, which can be said to coincide with the Thirty Years' War. An end was reached in 1648 with the Peace of Münster (a treaty part of the Peace of Westphalia), when the Dutch Republic was definitively recognised as an independent country. The Republic had already been recognized by Spain and the major European powers at the occasion of the Twelve Years' Truce of 1609. The Peace of Münster was also the start of the Dutch Golden Age.

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> there is one migrant group that's not willing to integrate
I do not know what it is, but I imagine it will be the unnamable group. One can shit in the holy catholic church, but friend, who dares to do the same in the unnamable?

Yes, I meant the Muslims.

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> Interestingly, San Nicolás or Sinterklaas in Dutch is the Santa Claus in Holland. He seems to be a saint who lives in Madrid, Spain, and is loaded with sweets for Dutch children.

The feast of Sinterklaas celebrates the name day of Saint Nicholas on 6 December. The feast is celebrated annually with the giving of gifts on St. Nicholas' Eve (5 December) in the northern parts of the Netherlands and on the morning of 6 December, Saint Nicholas Day, in the southern provinces of the Netherlands, as well as Belgium, Luxembourg and northern France (French Flanders, Lorraine and Artois). The tradition is also celebrated in territories of the former Dutch Empire, including Curaçao and Suriname.

Sinterklaas is based on the historical figure of Saint Nicholas (270–343), a Greek bishop of Myra in present-day Turkey.
Later moved to Madrid in Spain. He is depicted as an elderly, stately and serious man with white hair and a long, full beard. He wears a long red cape or chasuble over a traditional white bishop's alb and sometimes red stola, dons a red mitre and ruby ring, and holds a gold-coloured crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd's staff with a fancy curled top. He traditionally rides a white horse.
Sinterklaas carries a big, red book in which is written whether each child has been good or naughty in the past year.

All children regardless with or without religion ( except the Jehovah witnesses ) share this feast.
At age 7-8 the children are told by their parents and school teachers that Sinterklaas is not a true story and doesn't exist.

The festivities traditionally begin each year in mid-November (the first Saturday after 11 November), when Sinterklaas "arrives" by a steamboat at a designated seaside town, from Madrid in Spain.
In the Netherlands this takes place in a different port each year, whereas in Belgium it always takes place in the city of Antwerp. The steamboat anchors, then Sinterklaas disembarks and parades through the streets on his horse, welcomed by children cheering and singing traditional Sinterklaas songs. His Zwarte Piet assistants throw candy and small, round, gingerbread-like cookies, either kruidnoten or pepernoten, into the crowd. The event is broadcast live on national television in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Sinterklaas is the primary source of the popular Christmas icon of Santa Claus.

I watched the Sinterklaas movie too, cool movie.  :badgrin:
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jj2007

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #96 on: August 21, 2018, 11:40:05 AM »
The feast of Sinterklaas celebrates the name day of Saint Nicholas on 6 December. The feast is celebrated annually with the giving of gifts on St. Nicholas' Eve (5 December) in the northern parts of the Netherlands and on the morning of 6 December, Saint Nicholas Day, in the southern provinces of the Netherlands, as well as Belgium, Luxembourg and northern France (French Flanders, Lorraine and Artois). The tradition is also celebrated in territories of the former Dutch Empire, including Curaçao and Suriname.

Sinterklaas is based on the historical figure of Saint Nicholas (270–343), a Greek bishop of Myra in present-day Turkey.

You forgot some countries ;)
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In Europa (in particolare nei Paesi Bassi, in Belgio, Austria, Svizzera, Germania, Repubblica Ceca, Slovenia ed in alcune parti d'Italia) viene ancora rappresentato con abiti vescovili.

Siekmanski

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #97 on: August 21, 2018, 05:16:39 PM »
Thanks for the history lesson.  ;)

The Sinterklaas story goes all the way back to the Germanic Gods.

According to tradition, the children would leave their boots by the fireplace and fill them with roots, straw or sugar to feed the flying horse ( Sleipnir ) of Odin.
In return, Odin would replace the food with gifts or sweets. This practice survived in Belgium and the Netherlands even in the Christian era, associated with the figure of St. Nicholas.

That reminds me of a story in the Quran, prophet Muhammad flew to heaven on a winged horse.
Did I just came to the conclusion...... ohhh never mind.
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jj2007

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Fakebook
« Reply #98 on: September 14, 2018, 03:48:34 AM »
Since I do not have Facebook, I try to make friends outside of the real Facebook, applying the same principles.

So every day I go down the street and explain to passersby what I ate, how I feel, what I did the night before, what I'm going to do, what I will do tomorrow. I show some photos of my wife, my children and the dog, of me washing my car and of my wife sewing.

I also listen to people's conversations and say "I like it!"

And it's working!

Currently I already have 5 people following me: two policemen, a psychiatrist, a psychologist and a nurse.

felipe

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #99 on: September 14, 2018, 06:47:23 AM »
 :P
Felipe.

LiaoMi

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Re: Fakebook
« Reply #100 on: September 14, 2018, 07:35:02 AM »

Currently I already have 5 people following me: two policemen, a psychiatrist, a psychologist and a nurse.

 :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: good team!

HSE

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Re: Fakebook
« Reply #101 on: September 14, 2018, 09:04:40 AM »
Currently I already have 5 people following me: two policemen, a psychiatrist, a psychologist and a nurse.

Well... finally they find you  :lol:

hutch--

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Re: How programming works.....
« Reply #102 on: September 14, 2018, 04:09:19 PM »
The trick with Facebook  is not to get sucked in by the endless claptrap they wish to dump on you. Do you need hundreds to thousands of people you don't know passing a flood of chyte past you daily ? I ended up with a Facebook account after a blog I belonged to in Hong Kong was taken over by a mainland Chinese company that turned it to trash and the people I knew there went to Facebook. I run a closed account only accessible from people I know and have less than a dozen people in my friend list.

It is funny to see who they dredge up as new friend suggestions based of those you actually know. Some of these people I had not heard about for many years and will do my best not to hear from them for many years to come. I can tolerate the side ads but they keep trying to encroach on the message area and something that has been funny is their reaction to some of the recent security problems where they try to sound concerned about the data access they granted to a range of companies for a price.

I would not waste my time discussing politics on Facebook but now you have the Republican bureau of morality dictating what is hate speech and what is not driven by the #twitterati trial by stupidity.  :P
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jj2007

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Fakebook
« Reply #103 on: September 14, 2018, 06:28:13 PM »
I have basically two problems with Fakebook:

1. Too many people use it as their only platform. Even my local hobby group here insist that all their communications must go on FB, and nowhere else. So every time FB invites me to join, and I have to click "no thanks".

2. It sucks, it terribly sucks. Once you have communicated something through FB, you won't find it any more after a day or two because it will be buried among the claptrap. One of the most awful pieces of software I've ever seen. Only Adobe can compete!
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