Author Topic: how fast do you type your code?  (Read 224 times)

daydreamer

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how fast do you type your code?
« on: December 01, 2019, 09:22:48 PM »
Hi
how fast can you type your code,or easier type few pages of a story on computer,is it single fingers or you learned have your fingers above asdf and jkl something like the old way the qwerty keyboard was designed to type fast by having the most frequent in english characters nearest,or you have tested/come from another country where its a qwertz keyboard,because z's freqent used in croatia for example,or you need to type chinese characters?

code is hard to type fast because all (){}; asm code with 3 letters seem easier than HLL code has all kinds of |^:;{[]} . but you can have intellisense there to not need to type complex functions

once in school we computernerds decided to learn to type qwerty way and race to see who could type quickest
It's also can be kinda memmove from brain to computer
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 01:52:58 AM by daydreamer »
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jj2007

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2019, 11:04:30 AM »
Reasonable speed using 4-5 fingers. Lots of shortcuts when I code in my editor, e.g. .rep<space> expands to a complete .Repeat ... .Until loop, and that saves a lot of typing. Or ism<space> -> invoke SendMessage, etc etc,  I have more than 100 shortcuts defined.

Siekmanski

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2019, 11:14:25 AM »
I type at a very slow speed else I make too many mistakes writing my code.
Creative coders use backward thinking techniques as a strategy.

cman

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2019, 04:45:45 PM »
I learned to touch type in high school ( I think I can type around 40 words per minute - not great , but fast enough ). It's nice to be able to type code laying down with a laptop on my stomach or in dim light. :biggrin:

hutch--

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2019, 04:57:57 PM »
I can generally type fast enough to match the speed I design at. If repetition is involved I am faster using the clipboard. Global or selection replace makes changing values fast and easy but finally the speed you type at matters little if it does not match what you are doing. I have known secretaries that could type at 100 words a minute but back then it was only useful for duplication, these days a laser printer is faster.
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daydreamer

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2019, 10:06:34 PM »
@JJ
that sounds like fast coding with help of 100 code snippets,VC also haves some insert code snippets,but only few comes as standard,the rest you must import or make if you like that kinda code style
@cman
it works great to type things on laptop,worse playing games on old gaming laptops burn you
@siekmanski
precision and put lot of thinking in it,you produce great and fast code

@Hutch
I do like to put some effort in some areas first,before I write code,also likes to use clipboard much
I dislike to endup with lots of shuffles in my code
maybe a file that is loaded thats only textdata is fastest
I think clipboard and other copying is great for things you are skilled in,but if you are newbie at something you learn easier with hand/eye coordination typing at not too fast,you go thru brain/senses feedback loop
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Gone serverside programming p:  :D

AW

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2019, 08:00:18 PM »
I would not bother much with that unless I need to find a job as a data entry clerk.
I think here applies the same rule that applies to mathematicians and writers.
https://mathwithbaddrawings.com/2017/01/11/why-are-mathematicians-so-bad-at-arithmetic/

hutch--

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2019, 09:40:51 PM »
magnus,

The action is in code output, not typing speed as typing is only a part of producing code. Anything that you can save somewhere and reuse saves you far more than typing speed will give you, just look at big collections of include files, algorithm collections, libraries, pre-processor macros, editor macros and anything else that can put code in place, its output that matters as this gets applications written and working.

I have seen enough people who think there is some virtue in doing everything the hard way but their output is so low that they rarely ever get anything done. Your architecture is the useful stuff and here you have the difference between close range low level code that can be useful if its written properly and wide ranging high level code with appropriate high level analysis if it is done competently.

Assembler code has its advantages at the lowest level when written correctly but many miss the big picture, higher level code often has architectural advantages but can miss the mark in outright performance terms, between the two is the target area, high performance code with sound architecture that does the job properly.
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jj2007

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2019, 09:58:31 PM »
I have seen enough people who think there is some virtue in doing everything the hard way but their output is so low that they rarely ever get anything done.

Yeah, the "close to the metal" fans :thumbsup:

Being "close to the metal" is a necessary phase when you start coding. After a while, those who continue to write a dozen lines of code where print "hello" would suffice will forever be stuck in the details. And never forget that the guy who wrote the print macro was pretty close to the metal when he wrote it.

AW

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2019, 10:18:53 PM »
Actually, assembler is close to the metal by definition and is suitable to produce small optimized routines to be called from high-level language.
Except for small demos here, nobody really has been using assembly language in any other way for the last 20 years.

Assembly language libraries with supplied source code might be useful when we take the time to study how things happen in the library. This is the case of the Masm32 SDK. Most people do not do it, so will never properly learn Assembly Language. More, some people end confusing Masm with Masm32 which is somewhat fun, because we should never forget our roots- nothing in this site would exist without MASM in the first place. Nothing, even all alternative assemblers (some of them very good, BTW).

jj2007

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2019, 11:23:24 PM »
It works both ways: Masm would have long been forgotten if there had not been Masm32

Re "small demos", RichMasm has a 20k lines source that produces a 140k exe. That is certainly small compared to M$ Office :badgrin:

And I am sure that many of the old folks here have similar little toys programmed exclusively in Assembly.

AW

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2019, 12:20:59 AM »
Quote
It works both ways: Masm would have long been forgotten if there had not been Masm32
Masm is taught in high school without Masm32. Reverse engineering courses are taught in College. And there is great demand for experts in Assembly Language for security jobs. Masm is on the front line of all Assemblers, which does not mean that assemblers are on the front line of all source code building tools.

Quote
Re "small demos", RichMasm has a 20k lines source that produces a 140k exe. That is certainly small compared to M$ Office :badgrin:
Face reality. Nobody on planet Earth uses that thingamabob you made with the richedit control distributed by Microsoft.   :badgrin:




hutch--

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2019, 12:36:16 AM »
Go back a long way to about 1990 where you could write MASM code that was close enough to identical to a CodeView debugger, when the world was simple and a decent COM file could get you out of most trouble. I confess that as DOS was waning and early 16 bit Windows was on the rise I mainly worked in SDK style C but when 32 bit code hit the deck with NT4 and shortly after Win95, MASM took on a different complexion. You had the full API available, no more INT21h or INT10h and you could do far more useful things and write complete applications.

A patch for MASM that came out in 1997 made it a full 32 bit assembler and it was a decent high powered tool, albeit not for the kiddies and it gave rise to the work I did with Iczelion to make it usable for general purpose programming. In doing so it went the opposite direction to the current trends of ever more bloated, ever more layering code at a very high level and put miniature rockets into the hands of a vast number of programmers. It was something like flying a jet fighter along side of an air ship.

It has always had multiple uses in 32 bit, object modules to add performance to high level languages, normal freestanding executables and dynamic link libraries for any language that could call them, a combination that made it a very powerful tool.

Now the 64 bit version is truly fun, ml was terse enough but ml64 is an even more terse pig, a classic tool that bites the hand that feeds it but it forces the programmer to write decent code that works correctly, exactly the reason why I don't like soft easy languages that hide this from you and protects you from yourself. Better to have something explode in your face than a pile of crap that is near impossible to shovel your way through to find out why it crashed.
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daydreamer

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Re: how fast do you type your code?
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2019, 10:41:06 PM »
magnus,

The action is in code output, not typing speed as typing is only a part of producing code. Anything that you can save somewhere and reuse saves you far more than typing speed will give you, just look at big collections of include files, algorithm collections, libraries, pre-processor macros, editor macros and anything else that can put code in place, its output that matters as this gets applications written and working.

its also interesting what tools you use/prefer,clipboard,code snippet insert,intellisense ,muliple source files creating library of function and as newbie you start with only simple texteditor and moves to IDE and use more of the above functions
Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D