Author Topic: A useful system info toy.  (Read 1034 times)

hutch--

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A useful system info toy.
« on: December 23, 2019, 11:54:11 AM »
I am sure there are many others but this one has been very useful to me while building this i5 box. Just filled it with enough fans and the average disk temperature dropped 10c, from about 43c down to about 30 - 32c. Put a big cooler on the processor and it runs at about 27c so everything heat related seems to be well under control.

https://www.hwinfo.com/download/

This thing has taken a lot longer to get up and going than before, the win7 updates ran into the high hundreds and configuring it was slow as I had to test how everything worked with win7 but all of the main things required are up and running. When you get tired of looking at it and cannot find any more to do its ready to rock 'n roll.

Somewhere into next year I will find a 4 gig i7 that fits the 1150 socket and buy a couple of WD 4tb red hard disks as the Seagate 4tb disk that is in it at the moment is a bit long in the tooth. The main win after getting it up and running is I don't have to look at its guts any longer.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

Biterider

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2019, 06:54:06 PM »
Hi Hutch
Indeed, a very nice toy and for free  :thumbsup:
Thanks for sharing!

Biterider

jj2007

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2020, 06:40:18 AM »
Slightly OT: My rarely used Verbatim external 1TB drive has said goodbye  :sad:

I don't want to spend a fortune on a new one. Which is the best choice for you?

a) TOSHIBA Canvio Basics (1TB, 43€)
b) WD 1TB Elements (1TB, 48€)
c) Maxone 1TB Ultraslim (1TB, 53€)
d) Seagate Expansion (1TB, 56€)

Vortex

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2020, 06:52:22 AM »
Hi Jochen,

Not easy to make a comment but I would like to suggest Seagate Expansion.

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2020, 07:52:14 AM »
nice tool Hutch,thanks
Jochen I dont know
Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)

jj2007

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2020, 08:32:03 AM »
Thanks, Erol. The Verbatim really sucks, I've used it only twice a year for backups, and now it throws cyclic redundancy check errors at me, and randomly connects and disconnects... bad luck. Fortunately I have USB sticks with my sources and important private docs all over the place. But I might lose some fotos and other old stuff that I didn't backup :sad:

jj2007

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2020, 08:49:07 PM »
Actually, I'll go for the cheapest - Toshiba looks very good in the Backblaze stats :thumbsup:

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2020, 09:10:38 PM »
Actually, I'll go for the cheapest - Toshiba looks very good in the Backblaze stats :thumbsup:

thanks,checked toshiba prices on 2TB,3TB,4TB=400€,too much,but can store lots of data
and maybe bad invest in biggest looking at drive age and failures?
got 2TB= 100€,size like diskette but thicker compared to older I have that is old 5 inch drive in a case


Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)

hutch--

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2020, 10:02:06 PM »
Best bang for you buck (euro, rouble, yuan etc) at the moment is a 4tb drive. Many brands but my own choice for large storage is a WD 4tb RED which is a NAS drive. I lost a Seagate 4tb about a year ago and it was not that old so my recent purchases have been WD Red 4tb drives. I used up all of my old XP era 2tb Green drives in the file server as network data transfer rates are still slower than an old WD green and all I have left over is about 5 or 6 1tb WD green drives which are not much use these days.

I found a good design disk caddie from China that had no electronics in it, just direct SATA connections and I have one in each machine apart from my main dev box that always had a removable dist mount so the old 1tb drives can still be used for large data transfer as it is much faster than network transfer with a 1 gigabit network.

If you have enough money to waste in the future, the next gen computers will be able to use very fast NVM express storage, have chipsets that are fast enough and enough PCI express lanes and the real humour will be that they will be mainly used for email, Netflix and the like.  :tongue:
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2020, 10:56:01 PM »
Hutch,having seven biggest terabyte drives is like one tiny drop(asm program) in 7 Oceans  :greenclp:
Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2020, 08:08:24 PM »
I was thinking maybe some wooden case with lots of air and some airholes and plastics ontop for external drive would be good to make it protected
right now I just put it on a box so its protected from if I spill coffee on table or other liquid
Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)

hutch--

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2020, 12:40:00 AM »
Something a lot of people don't know is that you should never fill a disk up past about half its capacity. You can put more but they start to get slower as they fill up. Its usually called headroom. An SSD is a different device and they theoretically do not slow down as they fill up but they are still reasonably expensive. The SATA3 type are cheaper but are limited to about 500 mb / sec but the current batch of NVM Express storage devices are generally a lot faster again.

The Intel SSD in this 3 year old box reads at about 2.2 gig / sec and writes at just under 1 gig / sec. The Samsung SSD I put in recently is faster again reading at about 3.5 gig on large files and writing about 3.2 gig on large files.

Mechanical hard disks are still the most economical storage for large amounts of data, most modern boards support 6 or more SATA3 ports and with very big drives you can build massive storage into a single computer.

You have a three tiered price performance setup, NVM express drives are currently the fastest but most expensive, SATA3 SSDs which are slower but cheaper and mechanical HDDs that are the cheapest and largest storage but much slower.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2020, 01:00:31 AM »
Just ran defrag on almost everything I have,more than half usage of HD hutch,next time it maybe worth to move much GB to backup before defrag if filled too much,so defrag becomes much faster
If I fill drive with lots of. Very small Asm. Inc. Object. Exe, would be interesting to see performance before and after with HD testing
But isn't it mostly files become fragmented, when saving small source file, compile to small object,link to small exe, when the files getting bigger so it exceeds block size,file system need to find a free block far away write new data,causing more fragmented HD with many small files,than few big files does,that causes slow HD? Especially old mechanical drive,read head needs to move much more?

Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)

jj2007

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2020, 02:34:32 AM »
Zip the many small files, that saves an awful lot of disk space since even a tiny file takes at least one cluster.

daydreamer

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Re: A useful system info toy.
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2020, 05:53:48 AM »
Zip the many small files, that saves an awful lot of disk space since even a tiny file takes at least one cluster.
I try that,especially same asm language that have lots of same mnemonics and api calls and macros become smaller than mixed languages
Quote from Flashdance
Nick  :  When you give up your dream, you die
*wears a flameproof asbestos suit*
Gone serverside programming p:  :D
I love assembly,because its legal to write
princess:lea eax,luke
:)