Author Topic: Linux Box  (Read 435 times)

hutch--

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8892
  • Mnemonic Driven API Grinder
    • The MASM32 SDK
Linux Box
« on: November 11, 2021, 12:45:04 PM »
When you have been building computers for too long, you end up with a mountain of bits and piece spread around and you can get tired of all the junk floating around. I have had for some time a box that was built on a Gigabyte board with a i7 4770k and it always ran OK when I had Windows loaded into it but it could not be thrashed like the bigger socket 2011-3 CPUs so I had left it for a while. The board was given to me by my next door neighbor and I hunted around for the i7 in it.

To get all this stuff back together again, I have rebuilt the box and this time it has the current version of Linux Mint installed and it seems to run well with the i7 and 32 gig of DDR3. Plonked a WD Blue 1tb disk into it and ran the installation and everything seems to be working properly. I have to again work out how to configure all of the network settings to interface with other computers but that will comke with time and a lot of patience.  :tongue:
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

hutch--

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8892
  • Mnemonic Driven API Grinder
    • The MASM32 SDK
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2021, 07:13:17 PM »
I just got ExpressVPN going and PHARK, what a tangled mess it is to install on Linux. Use the DEB installer and run a multiple of commands to activate it and then get it started. I had to install Chrome to get Netflix working, fortunately Youtube worked OK.

Still, one you can get through the various installations, the box works well and it runs video fast enough. I found FireFox a pig to use after having used Google based browsers for a long time, it was good enough to download Slimjet which in turn was OK for downloading Chrome.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

Greenhorn

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 266
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2021, 11:58:24 PM »
If I would switch to Linux, I would give Manjaro Linux a try. It is Arch-based and is kind of a rolling release, which means it will always have the most recent Linux kernel on the run.

https://manjaro.org/

mabdelouahab

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 496
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2021, 02:38:30 AM »
Qubes OS is the best solution

Vortex

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2613
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2021, 05:05:23 AM »
I vote for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux derivatives.

Gunther

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3830
  • Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2021, 06:42:52 AM »
We can now list all possible distributions in turn. It's a matter of taste. When I started with kernel 1.2, I used Slackware, maintained by Patrick Volkerding.
This distribution is the origin of many others (RedHat, SUSE, Debian etc.) You have to do a lot yourself by hand, but you know your system pretty well afterwards.
Who wants to know his system very well and has a lot of time, you can try Linux from Scratch.

Although I used Linux for decades, I switched to FreeBSD about 4 years ago. I had good reasons for that. It's a rock solid system and compiles the software to be
installed from the sources - always, without exception. When it comes to network questions, NetBSD is a good choice. It runs everywhere, even on toasters.
Get your facts first, and then you can distort them.

daydreamer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1856
  • "follow the blue star!!!"
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2021, 07:00:58 AM »
got newer router and saw it runs linux mint and there is Samba for taking care of external hard drives connected to the router
SIMD fan and macro fan
I am an Invoker
"An Invoker is a mage who specializes in the manipulation of raw and elemental energies."

mineiro

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 830
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2021, 08:06:57 AM »
Slackware is only to programmers and advanced users. Very raw and solid in concept. Programs shared in .tar.gz need be compiled by user. When I first touch that I run quickly. All configuration should be done by final user, and this means, it's really secure or a lot faulty.

Creation of .deb files advance use of linux to final user, well, .rpm files too, instead of make,make install, autoconf, ... .
Knoppix introduced reiserfs and boot from cd-rom to ram memory(el torito!?). Vesa was a good choice to most cheap video cards.

The first linux that I touch was developed by an italian that I forgot name, was called mulinux. Was necessary boot from ms-dos and type the name of a .bat file to start booting in protected linux mode. So, others used was Red Hat, Conectiva, Mandriva, Kurumin, ..., really forgot others. Actually (k)Ubuntu and Mint are my choices because easy use.

I was listening that SUSE is one prefered by servers admin, very complete.
I remember Mikrotik, a linux network router. This version made me realize that I know absolutely nothing about networks and made me go back to wearing diapers.
I'd rather be this ambulant metamorphosis than to have that old opinion about everything

hutch--

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8892
  • Mnemonic Driven API Grinder
    • The MASM32 SDK
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2021, 08:48:14 AM »
Long ago I used to use Redhat for building bots and bouncers for IRC and back then you could put Redhat onto a box and it was simple, all command line back then and they were fun and fast. The dominance of Windows forced Linux distroes to do something about providing a UI and over time they have got better but something I lament is the underlying assumption that users are idiots and should be treated that way.

The notion of security by obscurity, multiple level obstruction and endless passwords nearly drives me nuts and sad to say its here to stay in both Windows and Linux. I had in the past played with Ubuntu but never really liked it, tried out a number of prebuilt special purpose distros that rarely ever did what they were supposed to do well and over the last few years, Linux Mint has been consistent and not endlessly playing musical chairs.

The current version seems to work well but as usual its geting harder to configure and there are more loops to have to jump through than the last version. I still have to configure Samba as its more complicated again than the last version, I would like to get TightVNC working but it looks like a nightmare to configure so that is not done yet either.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

hutch--

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8892
  • Mnemonic Driven API Grinder
    • The MASM32 SDK
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2021, 09:42:04 PM »
I had a motherboard turn up today to replace the damaged Gigabyte board I got from the US. It is a Huananzhi x99-BD4 GAMING board and it looks better than I expected. I just shoved the basics into it, a Xeon E5 2690 v3 12 core, some left over DDR4 memory and the boot disk from my just finished Linux box and powered it up and "surprise surprise", it worked straight off, beeps, debug leds ended up as AA and all is well.

Had a look at the BIOS and for a Chinese motherboard, it actually makes sense, the earlier ones I had were unintelligible. I have a couple of tools for Linux mint, CPU-X which is a rough imitation of CPU-Z and a tool called lm-sensors and while they are both a bit crude along side the Windows apps, it shown the 2.6 gig base clock running at idle at about 1.1 gig and all cores running in the low to middle 20s.

Interesting board, 2 x pcie x 16, 1 x pcie x4 and one pcie x 1. It will take 2 x nvme drives directly on the motherboard and has 4 SATA3 and 2 SATA2 ports which means it can run 6 HDDs. No longer any use for a CD/DVD drive as the USB3 ports handle larger and faster data. I had 2 x 8 gig DDR4 modules and 2 x 4 gig DDR4 modules out of my left over junk and installed it totals 24 gig of memory which seems to be enough in most instances.

Don't really know what to do with the setup, with delivery delays, an imported second hand Gigabyte board that was junk and everything turning up out of order, its almost an orphan but it looks like a decent board.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

Gunther

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3830
  • Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2021, 02:23:25 PM »
I had 2 x 8 gig DDR4 modules and 2 x 4 gig DDR4 modules out of my left over junk and installed it totals 24 gig of memory which seems to be enough in most instances.

I would also like to have such junk: A drive here, 24 GB RAM there, etc. It all sounds like a lot of fun, isn't it?
Get your facts first, and then you can distort them.

daydreamer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1856
  • "follow the blue star!!!"
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2021, 08:52:29 PM »
how is the timings of video processing in older computer with slower RAM and fewer channels compared to newest RAM with 4 channels?
mine is haswell based,but it only have 4gb builtin+16gb ram inserted,so that excludes 4 channels,wonder how performance is compared to yours 4channel with memory full of hires photorealistic textures?

if you run linux on minimum console,without GUI like KDE? in a long running benchmark,how is performance compared to have everything running?
SIMD fan and macro fan
I am an Invoker
"An Invoker is a mage who specializes in the manipulation of raw and elemental energies."

hutch--

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8892
  • Mnemonic Driven API Grinder
    • The MASM32 SDK
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2021, 12:32:35 AM »
On x99 boards, you ususally have either 4 or 8 memory slots and you need to have 4 modules to get 4 channel memory. My 3 x99 Gigabyte boards have 8 slots and the oldest one used to have 8 x 8 gig modules. With the replacement memory I have 4 x 16 gig modules and I had a couple of spare 16 gig modules so I put them in as well for 96 gig but to be honest, I have never run out of memory with 64 gig.

Depending on the software, core count is what matters processing video footage, it is very demanding on hardware and you must have good cooling to do it as you can routinely run all cores at 95 to 100% for long stretches at a time. I use the 12 core Xeon's for this task as their total processing power is very good and you have to go into exotica to do much more.

Memory speed does not matter all that much, the Xeon's run happily on 2400 or even slower, its the CPU that determines the speed of memory required. The later modules I have used are 2666 clocked up to 2999 in the BIOS.
hutch at movsd dot com
http://www.masm32.com    :biggrin:  :skrewy:

daydreamer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1856
  • "follow the blue star!!!"
Re: Linux Box
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2021, 02:42:39 AM »
Nowadays it's mostly make 3d lowpoly models and import into landscape program which have a library of materials
Not so demanding,more fun with make something surrealism looking pic than photorealistic hipoly things
You also can enjoy reduction of polys similar as enjoy instructions reduction in asm
So now I split between coding and make art,but 3d started with how impressed I was by how people who can hardly draw a straight line,could use technology and cpu grunt to make fantastic results
And me lacked enough skill to make good-looking sprites and no skill either in convince someone with great skill to help me in game graphics
Now when making AVX snippet that loops thru gigabytes of memory I am curious on test results on laptop vs 4channels memory Ofcourse xeon = bigger caches also makes better performance


SIMD fan and macro fan
I am an Invoker
"An Invoker is a mage who specializes in the manipulation of raw and elemental energies."